Sunday, August 29, 2010

WHY I LOVE OMAN: from an Islamic Perspective

People [usually Muscati Omanis and Arab Expats] are always asking me why I gave up the "good life" in my home country to live here for less pay, a smaller home, and foreign surroundings. Why I want a passport but don't need one anyway, for a love of Oman is already in my heart.

Expats from my home country generally have tons of reasons, ranging from salary and lifestyle, to love of adventure and the natural beauty of Oman. My perspective is a little different. So I don't fit the usual ignorant hick statement of "go home rich expat before you criticise Oman and Islam in Oman." Really? LOL :XD
For an Islamic reason I love Oman first and foremost because in Islam there is a blessing on the place from Allah subhanu wa ta'ala.

A historically documented saying of the Prophet Mohamed after the Kings of Oman accepted Islam after receiving his letter inviting them to the religion:
“My religion is Islam, and the people of Oman will be granted the blessings of Allah [fertility and game]. Blessedness is guaranteed for those who… believed in me without seeing me. Allah will strengthen Islam in the hearts of [the] Omanis.”

Oman came to Islam (UNLIKE the Quraysh tribe in MECCA IN SAUDI ARABIA) without fighting the Prophet Mohamed sallalahu alahi wa salaam, and without him ever visiting here, IN THE LIFETIME OF THE PROPHET MOHAMED sallalahu alahi wa salaam. For this reason, the Prophet said there would be a blessing on the land FROM ALLAH of animals and vegetation, and that Omanis would be granted the oppurtunity to have strong hearts in Islam if they continued to believe in Islam [see, you are not GUARANTEED THIS by your birth as an Omani, but by you being in/practicing Islam and being an Omani, Allah subhanhu wa ta'ala will take special care to strengthen your heart in Islam.

Umar, the second Caliph [leader] of the Muslims after Mohamed salalahu alahi wa salaam said to the Omanis, "Oh people of Oman, you willingly embraced Islam. You obeyed him and you caused no division or strife, so God has strengthened you for the purpose of good... and what the Prophet has said about you is honour enough until judgement day."

Like Al Madinah (formerly Yathrib in pre-Islamic days) Oman has a blessing from Allah on it.

***As a history buff, Oman has many Islamic sites of great historical value, such as Izki, where zakat [Islamic charity] was first taught to the Omanis, as testament to its rich Islamic history.***Oman is no longer an "Islamic country" in that it is part of a Caliphate (there is no Caliphate left BASED FROM ANY COUNTRY IN TODAY'S MODERN WORLD and the Global Muslims are weak in practice and belief and knowledge of their faith, and in that, divided within their selves). It is a Muslim-majority country nonetheless.

Islam governs (more than the country) the personal lives of the majority of the citizens of Oman, and they apply Islamic rulings about is or isn't to be done in their lives on a personal level.

Which is good for foreigners, as rulings in Islam that are for Muslims to take upon themselves (like fasting, not drinking alcohol, and women wearing jilbabs [abayas] and hijabs [headscarfs]) are not enforced upon them. As the Qu'ran forbids drinking, and showing skin and hair ect, it IS FOR the INDIVIDUAL MUSLIM to take upon themselves on a personal level, not for a governing body of Muslims to punish. Obedience or disobedience to these things for Muslims is direct from their Creator, not a governmental authority. Saudi Arabia (aka the Royal Saud Family), Iran, and Afghanistan (some parts of Pakistan too and Sudan ect) ARE WAAAAAAAY SCREWED UP IN THIS.

I love in Oman that I can do the beneficial act of wearing the face veil if I do so for God alone and not government or culture [some women in Oman, due to culture, I know, do not have this right but they should fight for it under Islam], but that should I not be so pious [I'm not] I can walk around with my face uncovered and or even not wear uber modest clothing at all, and I won't be harassed for it.

The benefit of this is Oman had less (not none) hypocrites than other so-called practicing-Islam countries I have visited. If men want to date and have sex, they do, and if they don't, they don't. If women want to wear hijab they do or they don't. If people want to drink, they do or they don't. While it is still looked down on by majority of society [and culture inspires hypocrisy and cowardice in some], such acts outside of Islam are legal on a governmental level, so if people want to be good, they are free to, and are better for it, and the ones that are bad, at least can be more obvious about it so they hurt the rest of the practicing Muslims less.

Yet, the laws that are for all peoples (even those in a Muslim land) are generally carried out. You kill someone, Muslim or non-Muslim, practicing or non-practicing, the law applies to you the same (at least a governmental ideal and general purpose).The thing I love about Oman the most though, is the Muslims here are no divided the same way they are in other countries. Sunni (me, you could say, I suppose, but I am supposed to be just a Muslim and not divide ourselves into sects), Shia (some good friends who I have learned from despite us supposed to be enemies lol), and Ibadhi (the Omani majority-and my aquaintance and friend majority) all get along here. We learn from eachother. If we are weirded out by the other, why they do something we don't, we ask why, and they tell us. If we think they are right after that, we change our practice. If we think they are wrong, we try to show them with evidences why we think we are right. If someone still has differences, we agree to disagree.

Islam is a religion of respect and wisdom, of teaching and constant learning. Other Gulf countries seem to forget this.

Oman also respects other religions. Oman has churches and temples. It isn't Mecca, this is halal. We want to learn from what the Christians and Hindu et all have to teach us, and if we don't respect them, how will they listen to us when we try to say why we are not as they are, why we think maybe we know something a little more in regards to how obtain peace?

Respect is a big issue in Oman, and I hope it is never abandoned by Omani Muslims as this same respect led them to listen about Islam in the first place, and to become Muslims.

7 comments:

bosnishmuslima said...

Dear sister,
very interesting and informative post. So Ilearned really new stuff from you, thank you...I did not know about the blessings of Oman. I read some stuff about Oman and saw a documentary on TV about Oman the last sultanate and was very impressed. They showed different kind of people from bedouins to townsfolk all told how they feel blessed in Oman. That impressed me much cause you won't find many countries today where the citizens are satisfied like that.
What you wrote about hypocracy I often thougt about this issue concerning Saudi especially. Is it really profitable to will the people to live islamically like the dress-code?? Will these people have the plus factor from Allah s.w.t. for example the women covering if they do it but would not do if it would not be compulsory?? In my opinion it is better to have the choice it is more faithfull...

Omani Princess (not Omani LOL) said...

bosnishmuslima: I agree. If it isn't done for the sake of Allah it isn't Islamic at all.

Malaika said...

Very interesting post. Your blog is really usefull.
Keep up the good work.

Lamya said...

Nice post.

Andrew Brown said...

As a Christian, this deep respect and tolerance for other faiths was an important aspect of Oman that made me come here (and more importantly to wish to remain here!). I don't think I could EVER live in Saudi Arabia where everthing is forced, people are hypocrites and the religious police have the majority in fear. May God continue to bless Oman as a good example for the entire region! Thanks for publishing this post!

Omani Princess (not Omani LOL) said...

Malaika & Lamya: Jazzakallah kheir!

Umm Ibrahim said...

Yes Oman sounds lovely...dh was in Muscat for a weekend to interview at the University there and he came back really blown over by how nice Muscat was and Oman in general from what people told him-even the Pakistani laborers on the campus told him they arent treated as badly as their brethren in Saudi are. We wanna try to go back to the region in a few years for another year of working and Oman tops our list, en'shallah